Six ways to make a difference in the 2013 Elections (Updated)

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Tuesday, 12 February 2013 - Last Updated on February 3, 2015

Signing up for #juanvote by filling up this google document will also help us communicate with you for any collaborative work in the coming weeks.

Photo: “Philippines - Vote” by Jeff Werner, c/o Flickr. Some Rights Reserved

How time flies! When Blog Watch launched in 2009, it was our vision to simply provide another avenue to promote voter education. Four years have passed and we went beyond voter education to include being a citizens’ watchdog for transparency and good governance.

Today, social media allows us to talk to one another with just one click of the mouse. If you are reading this article, then you are probably interested in being part of the solution and to make a difference in the 2013 elections.

 

How can you make a difference?

 

1. Know your beliefs.

It’s about time we all stand up for something. If you don’t have an opinion on some of the critical issues that we face, you may get carried away by the tide of history without knowing why. There is a wealth of information out there. Get the facts through research. Being informed is the beginning of political maturity.

Call to action: Check out our voter’s education page.

 

2. Start voter education in your own barangay

Start in your own barangay. There is a wide community network that we can use – your local church group, youth groups, senior-citizen gatherings even tricycle drivers and operators associations. Ask for your candidates’ specific programs that address the problems of the barangay. Many candidates can easily come up with “feel good” statements about a worthy concepts and ideas that few of us would disagree with but without any specified plans for realization.

Make it a point to gather all materials about the candidates that we can get hold of. Read the campaign leaflets distributed from door to door. Get out to meet and talk to them when they make the rounds of the neighborhood. Attend campaign meetings if possible. Consult our more politically savvy neighbors. Anything — just so we won’t be looking for coins to toss when we fill out that lower end of the ballot.

We, as voters, have a right to know. We also have a duty to inform ourselves.

 

Call to action: Download, printing and disseminate “Ano ang Plataporma?”. (Download the PDF file or here)

pun_0001_phil_elections
Source:
Get Real Philippines allows download, printing and dissemination. (Download the PDF file or here)
 

3. Spread the word that voting criteria should consider a candidate’s coherent platform, clear vision, character, competency

Does your candidate have what it takes?

Know your candidates– their complete profile, their political history, their business dealings, etc. How they achieve their present status can show us how competently they will be able to perform as our national leader. Don’t be swayed by popularity surveys, by their showbiz supporters, or by their promises alone.

Consider a voting criteria like the 4 C’s : character, competence, clear vision and coherent platforms as follows:

Coherent Platform- check their platforms if it is clear enough to get us from Point A to B. It should not be just motherhood statements.

Character- humility, moral clarity, integrity, decency, transparency, consistency.

Competency- intelligence, practicality, energy, decisiveness, a willingness to work hard, leadership, good ideas, track record.

Clear Vision – a clear idea of what vision and strategic agenda are needed to transform their local government unit or country. We have a right to expect excellence from those who seek public office.

Call to action: Share your voting criteria to friends.

4. Know your candidate’s campaign spending

We need to make sure that our candidates are transparent as to the sources of their campaign money and the true extent of their elections spending as this would impact directly on the candidates’ governance upon assumption to office. There is a lot that the public has to learn on Campaign Finance, such as Sources of Funds, the Expenditure side, Recording and Reportorial Requirements, Use of Public Funds and Properties, and Effects of Violation of Election Finance Laws and Rules.

You want your candidate to be transparent. You want your candidate to have integrity.

Here are the expenditure limits per registered voter in the constituency a candidate is running

  • Php 3.00 – individual candidate supported by political party
  • Php 5.00 – individual candidat not supported or nominated by political party
  • Php 5.00 – political parties

Call to action: Download the ebook on Basic Guide to the Laws and Rules Governing Election Finance in the Philippines.

 

5. Share information in your facebook wall, twitter , blog posts

Filipino internet users are opinion leaders and early adopters compared to traditional media consumers. If we share our views to our community, these can easily be shared to their friends and family members.

Maybe some of us have family members or friends who are non-internet users. Can you imagine if at least half of us go out of our way to pass on the knowledge to another non-internet user ? Social media has a multiplier effect in terms of information dissemination which we should take full advantage of.

Call to action: Share this blog post on twitter and facebook.

6. Be part of citizen power.

It is the desire of citizens to make sure the elections are fair and free.  Voter vigilance is the key to clean and fair campaigns, right?

As the lead online headquarters for #juanvote, Blog Watch will help report these violations to the COMELEC. The #juanvote was the first social media coverage by citizens in the 2010 elections. We will use the same hashtag for the 2013 elections. Blog Watch is committed to write more articles on voter education from now until May 2013. Share voter education and candidate’s campaign platforms using the hashtag #juanvote.

Signing up for #juanvote by filling up this google document will also help us communicate with you for any collaborative work in the coming weeks.

500x165-images-stories-Blog_Watch-juan-vote_1

Violations aren’t very difficult to spot. Here are some violations that ordinary citizens can easily detect and report.

– Campaigning on Maundy Thursday, March 28 , Good Friday, March 29, on the eve of Election Day and Election day,May 13.

-Printed materials such as leaflets that are larger than legal-sized bond paper, i.e., 8 ½ inches in width and 14 inches in length.

-Posters made of cloth, paper, cardboard or any other material, whether framed or posted, measuring more than 2 feet by 3 feet. Download the list of common poster areas for Metro Manila.

Call to action: The public can report any of these violations  and can send e-mails to isumbongsacomelec@gmail.com, send a tweet to @comelectv, or post a comment on http://facebook.com/pcosdemo. They can also fill out the feedback/incident report form they will find on http://mycomelec.tv. For those who know how to use hashtags on Twitter, adding #SumbongKo to tweets will facilitate the tracking of feedback or incident reports.

 

Photo: “Philippines – Vote” by Jeff Werner, c/o Flickr. Some Rights Reserved.

Noemi Lardizabal-Dado (98 Posts)

Noemi Lardizabal-Dado , a multi-awarded blogger and often known as @momblogger , advocates constructive engagement in issues on family and society. She is a prime time woman, a mother to three children and wife to her college sweetheart. Having fun and taking on more challenges is evident in the posts of her four blogs: parenting, food & recipes, Lifestyle and emerging media. She nurtures both her family and community in order to secure her children’s future and that of others. Disclosure: Organization affiliation include Scrap Pork Network. Family friends with Senator Pia Cayetano , Senator Alan P. Cayetano and Congressman Lino Cayetano. As of October 17, 2015 I am supporting Susan Ople for senator just as I did in 2010. I am not voting Bongbong Marcos for Vice President.


About Noemi Lardizabal-Dado

Noemi Lardizabal-Dado , a multi-awarded blogger and often known as @momblogger , advocates constructive engagement in issues on family and society. She is a prime time woman, a mother to three children and wife to her college sweetheart. Having fun and taking on more challenges is evident in the posts of her four blogs: parenting, food & recipes, Lifestyle and emerging media. She nurtures both her family and community in order to secure her children’s future and that of others. Disclosure: Organization affiliation include Scrap Pork Network. Family friends with Senator Pia Cayetano , Senator Alan P. Cayetano and Congressman Lino Cayetano. As of October 17, 2015 I am supporting Susan Ople for senator just as I did in 2010. I am not voting Bongbong Marcos for Vice President.

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